The Brooks Celebrate Life Event

As anyone who has experienced severe trauma knows – it can be devastating for the victim, friends, and family. Many activities that were previously taken for granted can be a frustrating challenge.

Bronson Photo by Connie GarcesRecently, however, Dr. Beth and I were lucky enough to participate in a truly fun and magical event. The Brooks Celebrate Life event, organized by Brooks Rehabilitation and Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point and sponsored by Bioness, was in honor of Trauma Awareness Month.

The evening kicked off with hostess and Physical Therapist Connie Garces sharing information about Brooks Rehabilitation, both the main facility in Jacksonville, FL and the outpatient facility in Hudson, FL where she is Center Manager. She introduced the trauma survivors who were in the audience, signified with large red, white, and blue ribbons. Also recognized were their family members and the rehabilitation specialists who care for them.

Bronson Photo by Connie GarcesConnie Garces is a passionate and wonderfully talented therapist, but the highlight of the event was one of her patients, Bronson. Dressed in a suit, he stood in front of the group and delivered an honest, funny, heartfelt account of his recovery from traumatic brain injury. Public speaking is intimidating for the average person. Bronson was courageous to deliver his talk and willing to get a little help from the audience when he needed it. With multiple notes in front of him, Bronson talked about his recovery, his care, and his young daughter.  It was one of the most heart-felt and moving things I have witnessed in a long time.

May 2015 is the 27th observance of Trauma Awareness Month. The American Trauma Society has declared this year’s theme “3D Trauma Prevention” and focuses on contributors to motor vehicle crashes – Drugs/Drinking, Distraction and Drowsiness.

Vision is a critical part of life and it can be an important part of rehabilitation for a survivor of traumatic brain injury. Dr. Beth and I work in conjunction with other professionals to provide visual rehabilitation. It is complex work and some of the rewarding care that we provide. You can learn more about visual rehabilitation here.

 -Dr. Nate

(Photos provided courtesy of Connie Garces, PT, DPT, CBIS)

 

“Foolproof” Eye Test for ADHD

We have known for years that there is a link between how the eyes work and attention. This is why there are so many children who have both Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and visual coordination problems. Pediatric optometrists see this in the exam room every day and it is our job to help sort out how much of a child’s difficulty is due to ADHD and how much is due to not being able to visual focus and move their eyes efficiently.

There is some new research about ADHD and eye movements that is very compelling. Researchers in Tel Aviv, Israel, led by Moshe Fried, MD, have found that by simply monitoring involuntary eye movements, ADHD can be diagnosed.

“This test is affordable and accessible, rendering it a practical and foolproof tool for medical professionals,” said Dr. Fried. “With other tests, you can slip up, make ‘mistakes’ — intentionally or not. But our test cannot be fooled. Eye movements tracked in this test are involuntary, so they constitute a sound physiological marker of ADHD.

The study also showed that Ritalin (methylphenidate) does work in improving ADHD as measured by eye movement control. What was not researched in this study is how much other treatments that also improve eye movement control influence ADHD. Optometric vision therapy is commonly used to help patients improve their voluntary and involuntary eye movements.

Clearly more research is needed to better understand the relationship between ADHD and eye control, but this new study is a step in the right direction.

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An Infographic About Amblyopia

There is a lot of discussion lately about amblyopia (AKA lazy eye), largely due to the recent news reports of adaptations of Tetris and other video games as treatments for amblyopia. As I described in my previous post, these new binocular techniques are definitely better than old-school patching. However, in there essence, these techniques are not new. In fact, optometrists have known for a long time that treating two eyes is better than one. That is the basis of what we do in the vision therapy room to help patients with amblyopia – play games with both eyes at the same time.

I’m very happy to share with you an infographic on amblyopia treatment from the VisionHelp blog.

Amblyopia Infographic

You can read the full story behind the origin of this excellent infographic here. I think it is fantastic!

If you and your child are struggling with patching – you don’t have to be! Not only is binocular therapy more effective than patching – it is way more fun! If you have questions about amblyopia, vision’s therapy, or children’s vision in general, do not hesitate to give us at call at 813-792-0637 or email me at Doc@BrightEyesTampa.com.

And please  – share, pin, tweet or photocopy this infographic!

Dr. Nate

By Nathan Bonilla-Warford, OD
Bright Eyes Family Vision Care
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